A Glasgow & Airdrie Dictionary

A

a’ve …………………………………………………………….I’ve
aboot ………………………………………………………. about
afore ………………………………………………………..before
auld …………………………………………………………….Old
Aw…………………….All, as in “Aw for one, and one for aw”,
or at the startof a sentence for “Oh”, as in “Aw gie’s a break”.
awfy ………………………………………………………….awful
aye……………………………………Yes. Sometimes used more broadly as an acknowledgement on meeting a friend or acquaintance with the one word ‘Aye’. Also used for ‘always’, as in ‘we’ll aye be grateful to you’.

B

babber………………..The “master of ceremonies” at a tossing
school. The person who takes bets, and pays out winnings. The babber takes a cut of a tosser’s winnings.
babbin……………………………….What a “Babber” does – see
entry for “Babber”
bevy……….noun, verb or adjective, all meaning drink. e.g. “I had a real bevy last night”, He’s wan of the bevy boys”, “Lets get bevied tonight”
bide ……………………………………………………… stay
bing………………………………….A large artificial hill of coal,
often dangerous. Term ‘on the bing’ used to describe horse running badly.
bit laddies………..“Only boys”, “just boys”, literally “but boys”
bob……………………..a ‘shilling’ in old UK currency, with 20
shillings to the pound, so the “ten bob note” = 50P in current money.
Bogie-man………………………Some times pronounced and spelt “bogey man”, “boogie man” or boogeyman”. An imaginary monster used to frighten children.
bools …………………………………………………marbles
bottom shop……..Typical name given to the pub at the end
(i.e. bottom) of a town. Similarly, “top shop”, or “middle shop”.
broo………………….brow; also used to describe the local employment exchange, or bureau (“the broo”).
bum fluff …………………………..Light, soft facial hair.
bunnock…………………………………………..Small hill

C

cairn……………..Mound of stones, marking summit of hill or
mountain.
canny ………………………………………………….. can’t
carry-out…..Beer and other alcohol, bought in pub or shop, and “carried out” in a bag or box.
chap …………………….Knock, as in “To knock on the door”
chapper-Up………………A human alarm-clock. A person who
knocks on people’s doors to wake them up, making sure they get to work on time.
chuffed……………………….Proud. “Chuffed as hell” would be
used to describe a feeling of extra pride.
Cooncil ……………………….. Council, Local Authority
crusher………………“The Crusher” was the name given to the valley between Calderbank and Chapelhall – the ultimate natural children’s playground.
cuff…………………………To beat in a game or competition, or
to actually hit someone.

D

d’ye……………“Do You” or “would you” as in “D’ye fancy a dance”.
dae …………………………………………………………… Do
dead ………………………………………“Very” or “extremely
deed……………….“dead”, as in “You’re a deed man if ye tell anybody”.
deedle……………….The sound and general lilt of Scottish country music, jigs and reels, expressed in a series of “deedles”, as in “De de de De De De Deedle de de de de……..”.
deedling……………..Accompanying a song or tune with a deedle. See entry for “Deedle”.
didna ……………………………………………………. didn’t. Sometimes written as ‘didnae’.
disnae ………………………………………………….. doesn’t
dochter ……………………………….Old Scots for Daughter
donner………………………………..To wander; a gentle stroll, often with no real destination in mind.
doon ………………………………………………………down
downdie ……………….A resident of the town of Whitburn
dreecht ………………………………………… Also “Dricht”.
Miserable, wet weather.

E

eedgit…………………..Idiot, although often used in such a way that offence is rarely taken. For example, you might hear on the football field “Ya wee eedjit – ye should’ve passed it!”.

F

fa’ …………………………………………………………. Fall
fae …………………………………………………………from
faur ………………………………………………………… far
feart ……………………………………….frightened, scared
fearty …………wimp; someone frightened to do something
feyther ………………………………. Old Scots for “Father.”
fir ……………………………………………………………for
fish supper ……………..Fried fish and chips (French Fries)
freen …………………………………………………… friend
fur …………………………………………………………..for

G

gan ………………………………………………………going
gane ………………………………………………………gone
gie …………………………………………………………give
gonna.Going to. Sometimes pronounced “goanna”, or “gunna”
or “goannie”.
greet ……………………… Cry. As in “She had a wee greet”.
gutty………………Gutties (pl). Sandshoes, trainers. Especially the white canvas types much loved by mum’s for their schoolkids.

H

hae ……………………………………………………….have
half a crown……………….Two shillings and six pence in old money. 8 of these in a pound.
havny …………………………………. “have not”, “haven’t”
heeds…………………..Heads, as in “heads or tails”, or “two heads are better than one”.
helluva …………Extremely good. Contraction of “Hell of a”.
hen…………….girl, or woman, usually used affectionately and placed at the end of a sentence. E.g. “Are you all right there hen”
hied …………………………………………………….. head
Hoo ……………………………………………………… How
hutch…………..A metal container, normally on railway tracks, to transport coal or other heavy loads
huv ……………………………………………………… Have

I

intae ………………………………………………………into

J

jist …………………………………………………………just

K

kinda …………… kind of, as in “I don’t like that kinda bread”.

L

laddie ……………………………………………….. lad. boy
laldy…..volume, effort, energy, as in ‘to give it the full laldy’
lugger………….A steam train with protruding metal protective guards at the front, which look like ears, or lugs (Scottish word for ear).
lumber…………..Person whom you pick up on a date, especially at the dancing. To “get lumbered” is to be picked up, and to “Go after a lumber” is to look for someone to pick up.

M

ma …………………………………………………………my
mair …………………………………………………….. more
maun ……………………………………………………must
maw ………………………………………………….. mother
moothie …………………………. Mouth Organ, Harmonica

N

natter ……………………… chat, discussion, friendly gossip
neep ………………………………………………………. turnip
no……………………………….Used instead of “not”, as in “can ye no be such a big pain”.

O

o ………………………………………………………………of
oor ………………………………………………………… our
oors ………………………………………………………..hours
oot …………………………………………………………..out

P

poke………………………..A bag, normally paper, as in “A poke of chips”, or “Put your sweets in a poke”.
proddies ………………………………………….. Protestants
puir ………………………………………………………. poor

S

scooshie…………………A game similar to “tag” or “Hide and Seek”. One person counts to a large number while everyone else goes anywhere to hide. Game is over when all people have been found. Often used as cruel practical joke, with people going to the cinema leaving the hapless person to wander around all day.
scraps……………….collections of shaped paper pictures, normally produced in sets covering related subjects (for example angels, well known scenes, animals etc.) Scrap collecting
was a popular hobby among young girls, who would exchange their “scraps” with friends. Collections were
normally kept in large “scrapbooks”.
skint …………………………….. Penniless, having no money
sma’ …………………………………………………………small
snaw ………………………………………………………..snow
sparra ……………………………………………………sparrow
spyug …………………………………………………….sparrow
stiffie……………………………..Noun, meaning someone who is physically inflexible, as in “you can’t even touch your toes, ya big stiffie”

T

tae ……………………………………………………………to
tak ………………………………………………………… take
tanner ……………..Six old pence – a small shiny silver coin
tatties ……………………………………………….. potatoes
telt …………………………………………………………. told
the noo ……………………………………………….. just now
the shows ……………………………………… The fairground
tossing school………………….People gathered to gamble on the result of the toss of two pennies. Two Heads, tosser wins, two tails tosser loses.
thrawn…………………………..stubborn, particularly over a point when you know full well you are wrong.

W

wae……………………………With. Can be pronounced to sound like “wae” or “wi”.
wan……………………..One. Sometimes used as plural, “wans”, meaning more than one.
wance ……………………………………………………once
wasny……“wasn’t” or “was not”, as in “It wasny ma fault”
wean ……………………………………………..baby, child
wee……………………small, tiny, sometimes used to mean “less than”, as in “wait a wee minute”.
welly…………………noun, a shortened form of Wellington. As an adverb, used to mean extra effort, as in “Gie it some more welly there”.
Wheesh or Wheesht………………….A request for someone to “Keep you voice down”, or “stop talking”. Equivalent to holding your index finger to your lips and making the “Shhh” sound
whit ……………………………………………………..What
wi’ ……………………………….. shortened form of “with”
wid ……………………………………………………..would
widnae …………………………………………….. wouldn’t
wis ………………………….. Local pronunciation of “was”.
wisnae ………………………….Was not. Opposite of “wis”.

Y

ya ………………………………………………………….You
ye ………………………………………………………….You
yer ……………………………….. “You are”, or “you were”.
yersel ……………………………………………….. yourself
yin ………….. One, as in “The big yin” or “That yin’s mine”
yir …………………………………………………. See “Yer”
yiv ……………………………………….. You have, you’ve